admin

Website:

Bio:

  • The storm

    Adventures, Chickens, Poultry, Sheep, videoComments (1)

    On December 10, 2014 • By

    Well, what a couple of days. It’s not over yet, but I hope that’s the end of the drama anyway.

    I suppose the storm build up started on Monday. The forecast was for strong winds, so I had to prepare for it.

    IMG_3716.JPG

    My father and I secured the hen house by anchoring it down with wheelie bins and barrels full of water, around 900kg in total. After that I tidied up as much of the stuff lying about as I could, to make sure it didn’t blow away and cause any more damage.

    All good, I thought.

    Tuesday was a rough morning & started with a wee interview on Radio Scotland’s Good Morning Scotland news programme, talking about the weather, before I went to work. While at work, the forecast for Wednesday was upgraded to an Amber alert by the Met Office and most public services were closed to the public. I work for the council and we were all told to use our own judgement to decide whether it was safe to travel to work or not.

    I got home around 5.30 on Tuesday and decided to make sure everything was secure before the wind blew up again. This was the forecast on Tuesday:

    IMG_3735.PNG

    First stop was the hen house. Everything was ok and then my dad happened to phone while I was up there. While on the phone, lightning struck nearby, with the thunder less than half a second later. Now, my hen house is on the highest point of my croft so I decided to get out of there asap! I hung up the phone without saying anything and hurdled the fence beside me and got into the house before my dad phoned back to see if I’d been fried!

    So we got through the night ok. I woke up around 2 and put my ear plugs in, as the noise was keeping me awake. I woke up at 6 & noticed my alarm clock flashing, indicating a power cut, before it went off again around 7. We ended up not having any power until after midday, although there was plenty to keep me busy before that.

    I went in to check the sheep just before dawn (around 8, which sounds less impressive!) and came back via the hen house. I can see it from my house & looked ok, but, on closer inspection, some of the roof was missing, with several other sections flapping in the wind. I checked the birds inside; one dead and the whole place soaked. I had cleaned it all out on Monday, but that didn’t last long!

    IMG_3750.JPG

    That’s the only photo I have of it, as pictures weren’t really a priority! Fortunately the wind died down a little, gusting probably 40-50mph, so with the help of my neighbours James and Donnie, we managed to replace the missing sheet and secure the rest of the roof.

    Another power cut and 3 hours without internet but we can live without that! Credit to the Hydro boys who got us all back up and running, and also the BT guys who fixed the fault. Shame I can’t say the same about Vodafone, as I haven’t had any signal since 8.15am.

    After the hectic morning, I went to the Butt & Port to take some photos & video. You can see more of them on the facebook page but here is my favourite

    IMG_3776.JPG

    Read More
  • Video of the storm

    AgricultreComments (0)

    On December 10, 2014 • By

    Some footage from the Butt and Port today

    Read More
  • Scrap The Crofters Tax

    AgricultreComments (1)

    On November 13, 2014 • By

    Every time I see adverts in the newspaper for croft registrations, I get annoyed. Crofters are paying for the dereliction of duty by the Crofters Commission for generations – I will refer to the registration fee as the Crofters Tax from now on.

    reg

    In the Ness paper, Fios, today, I counted 16 applications to register crofts. Lets do the sums: each registration costs £90 and at least £36 to advertise. (90+36) x 16 = £2016.

    Two thousand pounds out of crofters’ pockets just like that, and nearly £1500 of it leaving the fragile local economy. What do we have to show for it? Nothing but a pain in our backsides from sitting filling in the paperwork.

    You also may have to get assistance with the mapping as well, which will come with additional costs.

    The main reason I am annoyed by this tax is that it is all mapping work that the Crofters Commission should have been doing over the years and now you can barely do anything with a croft without going through the tax process.

    Scrap the Crofters Tax and get bureaucrats to do the jobs they were supposed to be doing all along.

    Read More
  • Calendar

    Adventures, Agricultre, Chickens, Dog, Fishing, Lambs, Peats, Pigs, Poultry, Sheep, tractor, WildlifeComments (2)

    On October 25, 2014 • By

    2015 is just around the corner, fancy an Air An Lot calendar? I’ve printed a few using some of the most popular photos from the past year and I’m selling them for £10. Leave a comment if you’re interested, payment via PayPal.

    Here are some of the photos:

    IMG_3168.JPG

    IMG_3166.JPG

    IMG_3164.JPG

    IMG_3169.JPG

    IMG_3175.JPG

    IMG_3174.JPG

    IMG_3176.JPG

    Read More
  • Miffed

    ChickensComments (2)

    On October 23, 2014 • By

    I’m a bit miffed tonight.

    You may remember a few weeks ago that I had an inspection on the hen house, to make sure it was all in order. As part of that, I had to get a couple more feeders, so I duly ordered them, along with other bits and pieces on my week’s holiday last week.

    The company had previously sent me a massive cardboard box with feeders & drinkers, which came via courier for a very reasonable £13.95.

    This time, they decided to do the same, but strap the box to a pallet for extra strength. I paid my £13.95 and the box came on Tuesday. Happy days.

    Tonight I got home to an invoice for an ADDITIONAL £60 from the courier for transporting a pallet from Inverness!!!

    I’m astounded. I managed to manoeuvre the ‘pallet’ on my own, as it wasn’t that heavy. I’m not sure what steps to take, but I’m not keen at all at paying the extra £60.

    Suggestions?

    Read More
  • Good & bad

    Adventures, Agricultre, Chickens, death, Ducklings, Ducks, eggsComments (2)

    On October 12, 2014 • By

    I’ve had such a hectic few months I’m now in Glasgow for the weekend, relaxing. My mind never drifts far from the croft, though.

    I have a sense of satisfaction this weekend, I have made progress in the right areas and I am confident that the croft is going to provide a viable income.

    Through the day job, I had to pop out to the dump in Stornoway, where I took the opportunity to ask a question about a subject that I’d been thinking of for a while; using old tyres as an animal shelter on the croft. My crofts are flat and offer little in terms of shelter from the wind, and this is a (hopefully) cheap way of doing it.

    It was recommended that I contact SEPA though, as there may be an issue in terms of pollution. I did that and applied for a licence which now means I’ll be able to take old tyres from garages etc and create wind breaks with them for this winter.

    I’ve also been working on the efficiency of the hen house. I think I’ve got my system in place for ensuring the maximum number of eggs remain clean (I can’t sell dirty ones in shops) and now all I have to do is get my lighting situation sorted and I’m good to go! I think I have finalised my labels too, so hope to get them finished shortly.

    I’m on a week’s holiday from work now, so I’m getting round to sorting out all the wee jobs that I can’t get to in a normal week.

    The one aspect of the hen house I have to improve is the mucking out; I spend too long moving wheelbarrowloads of it and end up reacting to the wood shavings I put down. This is how I combat it!

    IMG_3026.JPG

    IMG_3024.JPG

    One negative from this week was an apparent otter attack on one of my young ducks. I found it like this on Thursday night.

    IMG_3018.JPG

    I’ve lost a couple of birds to a buzzard attack in early 2013, but never any to ground predators. I’ll perhaps have to be more vigilant now.

    Read More
  • A busy Monday

    Adventures, Agricultre, Lambs, Pigs, Poultry, SheepComments (1)

    On October 7, 2014 • By

    I used to blog about busy Saturdays, but that’s not as much the case any more. Since reducing my hours at work, I am off every Monday and I now have a wee bit more time to split work between Saturday and Monday.

    This week was a bit of catch-up on Saturday, as I’d been away for work Wed-Fri the previous week. Hen houses were cleaned on Saturday and lots of other jobs too, mainly working on getting electricity connected to my portacabin. My cousin and uncle (both electricians) were over and got most of the work done. It’ll make a difference having power to the place, especially now that it’s getting dark. I’ll also have to work on lighting the hen house – although I’ve got that one figured out in my head.

    So Monday was awful, weather wise. We had gale force winds and pouring rain, so it was a day for doing indoor chores. That meant cleaning out the portacabin and organising things the way I want them. Once I have a picture in my head of how I want things to be, it’s not easy to persuade me to do something different – I have to know if my idea works!

    Once the portacabin had been sorted, it was off to the lambs with me. The Government announced a new subsidy scheme for less favoured areas earlier this year, with each ewe hogg kept meaning a payment of €100 (around £80). No one seems to be sure when it is kicking in, so I have kept every single female lamb that was born, in the hope of receiving extra payment, but I’m hearing now that it won’t kick in until next year and that means getting rid of this year’s females.

    There is one more sale here, on Thursday 16th Oct, so I have gone through my lambs and kept 18 for breeding, with 17 going. There are a few more being kept for the freezer.

    These are some of the ones I’m keeping

    IMG_2989.JPG

    As you can see, they are mainly Cheviots, as I am looking to build up my cheviot flock. There are a couple of nice Suffolk/Cheviot crosses in there too, along with some Suffolk/Roussin hybrids. I have plans for them, and we’ll see how they go.

    The rest are off to sale on the 16th, and I’ll need to borrow a trailer for the day, as mine won’t take 17.

    IMG_2987.JPG

    Next up is to book in some lambs and pigs for slaughter. October is turning into a busier month than I expected, although I am off to Glasgow for the weekend for some much needed R&R!

    Read More
  • Quad

    Chickens, tractorComments (0)

    On October 5, 2014 • By

    So. I bought a quad.

    IMG_2906.JPG

    I’ve never had one before but the chicken work kind of forced my hand. Carrying 5-10 bags of feed up to the hens isn’t really an option and the pickup was going to end up damaged if I carried on, so I got this instead.

    I’ve done a heck of a lot of spinning around with it – it’s great!

    It’s a diesel quad. 2 wheel drive. Not fast but it is exactly what I’m after. Very happy.

    Read More
  • Catch up

    Adventures, Agricultre, SheepComments (0)

    On October 5, 2014 • By

    I’ve never been good at keeping the blog up to date in the summer months, mainly due to the fact I’m out working while the sun’s out! Now the nights are getting longer, I’ll have more time to share my thoughts.

    At the time of my last post, I was embarking on the first of two Farpaisean Chon Chaorach film trips; the first to Tain for the World Sheepdog Trial and the second to Roscommon in Ireland, for the International. I actually came home early from the World Trial because Ness were in the Lewis Cup final – and we went and won 3-1!

    IMG_2697.PNG

    IMG_2696.PNG

    Back home, it’s the time of year when changes are made to your stock. I’ve bought in around 20 new ewes, while some of the older ones had to go, due to missing teeth or faulty udders.

    IMG_2824.JPG

    It’s not a job I particularly like, but it’s better for the sheep to be sent away, rather than struggle through the winter here.

    I wasn’t happy with my prices in Dingwall though, particularly for the 11 lambs I sent away. I think I might try the Stornoway Mart next time, at least I can take them home if I’m really unimpressed!

    Read More
  • More Guga ‘controversy’

    GugaComments (0)

    On September 5, 2014 • By

    I started writing the piece below as a letter to the Times, to complain about an article that appeared in the paper on Tuesday of this week. I’ve since learned that the story was also on Good Morning Scotland on Radio Scotland on Wednesday, but I am unsure as to whether or not this article prompted the BBC to follow it up.

    Here is an image of the article, I don’t want to link to the original.

    IMG_2645.PNG

    On Tuesday 2nd September, a story ran in The Times newspaper on the Guga Hunt titled ‘Scottish SPCA wants end to ‘brutal’ hunt’ and I wish to raise some issues with the reporting of this.

    While the SSPCA has raised issues in regards to the Guga Hunt in the past, they have not, to my knowledge, issued a press release on this matter since 2011. The piece in the paper appears to be a rehash of old releases, with no new quotes and referring to SSPCA efforts from over 3 years ago. Why this is deemed to be newsworthy is unclear.

    There are also no attempts to gain the Ness men’s perspective, with a quote from John MacFarlane (Dods) lifted from a 2011 BBC documentary. The article also describes Mr MacFarlane as ‘retired from leading the cull’. Mr MacFarlane is currently on Sulasgeir, having led and partaken in this year’s hunt.

    I also have issues with some of the over the top language used in the report. I am unsure as to why they are referred to as ‘baby’ gannets. This kind of language is not used when talking about ‘baby’ lambs or ‘baby’ chickens as food sources. It is an unacceptable bias in the article, attempting to humanise the juvenile gannets and make them appear ‘cute’.

    The description of the process after death is also unnecessary. Use of words like ‘decapitated’ and ‘singed’ are totally unnecessary in this context. Nearly every animal eaten in the UK is decapitated after slaughter, yet we won’t hear of a piece of sirloin steak having been decapitated, skinned and butchered as part of it’s preparation.

    That brings me to the slaughter process. It is described in the article as ‘clubbed to death’ and ‘killed with a stick’. These terms are used, in my opinion, in an inflammatory manner to make it appear barbaric and give the image of numerous blows required to kill each bird. This is not the case, with birds killed by a single blow and are dead within 2-3 seconds of leaving the nest.

    We currently have an issue of geese wreaking havoc on crops and land in the Western Isles and the only way of dealing with this is shooting them. This is deemed to be acceptable, despite wounded birds dropping from the sky and possibly dying a slow and painful death.

    Do the SSPCA or news media raise issues about this on as regular a basis as they do about the Guga? Or about Halal slaughter? Or the mincing of male chicks, which are of no use to egg laying industry, at birth? No, because these have big industry and money behind them. They continually target a small community and attempt to bring negative world-wide attention on them through half-truths and inflammatory language.

    Long live the Guga Hunt!

    Read More